Bake offs and Show offs

So far, unemployment has suited me very well. Apart from having no money (who needs that anyway right?!) I have spent the last few weeks since leaving my job with Lidl, mainly cooking. Researching meals, planning menus and preparing lunches, dinners and desserts. I’ve never been busier. It actually takes a lot more time than you think, especially when you’re not used to making everything from scratch. It has been fun though and I have I been trying out lots of different dishes. My other half has been loving life! This is not all for his benefit though, this is all for my new job.

The estate my other half works on as Head Gardener was looking for a new Housekeeper around the time I handed in my notice. Pretty good timing right? I always believe in seizing opportunities when they arise, so I put myself forward and was really pleased when I got offered the job. One of my main duties as housekeeper will be cooking for a family of six, in a lovely newly refurbished manor house. I can’t wait. I just hope my cooking is up to the challenge, bearing in mind one of them used to be a food critic! I have high expectations to meet, but I can only get better I guess.

Other than that, the animals have been keeping me busy and I got the opportunity to show off my rare breed Silver Appleyard ducklings at the Mid Devon Show yesterday. I recently became a member of the Rare Breed Survival Trust and offered to help out at their stand during the day. As part of the stand they like to showcase some rare breeds, so I offered up my ducklings as they are always a hit with people, especially children.


In addition to helping the charity out, I also wanted to use this as an opportunity to meet people, network and gain knowledge from people who keep and raise rare breeds, something that we are looking to go into in the near future.

The day before the show, in true British Summer style, it rained really heavily, which left the ground incredibly soft and wet. In no time at all, it was churned up into a complete mud bath. Luckily we recently acquired a 4×4 so it was perfect to transport the ducklings and myself to the show safely. However, I’d never really driven a 4×4 before, let alone used the four wheel drive whatsit, so like many others ended up stuck in the mud and ended up getting winched out by a tractor. Despite being slightly stressful, it was actually quite fun!


The ducklings loved the attention they got during the show and everyone who came to the stand was completely taken by them. I got asked lots of questions and people had a genuine interest, not only for the cute ducklings but also rare breeds. I met lots of lovely people and made some excellent contacts, from business networking to potential future customers! The stand also won second prize, so a great day all round. I even got to sample some local cider and cheese, so I was a happy girl indeed. Roll on next year when I think we will try our hand at entering into the poultry show! 


 

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Farm dramas

I have just realised that it has actually been over four weeks since my last blog post, so apologies for the radio silence. Lots has happened, including quitting my job and currently being unemployed. Fear not though, there are plans afoot and I am in the process of being offered another job, with some side-line perks.

Our Oxford Sandy and Black weaners are now fully settled into the woodland and are loving life amongst the brambles. They were a bit more hesitant around us to begin with compared to the Lops, but they have certainly become a lot more comfortable in human company and currently enjoy a good ear scratch and back rub whilst eating their breakfast. Spoilt much?!

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We have also experienced our first pig escape. I was at work, so I missed all the fun/anarchy, but it just goes to show you need to be extra vigilant when it comes to ensuring the electric fence is indeed electrified. No harm was done, to the two pigs that escaped or the surrounding gardens, and I’m pretty sure they thoroughly enjoyed their little outing. One of the pigs didn’t actually escape and was visibly upset that she was left behind and missed out on the others’ adventures. Let’s hope she doesn’t initiate another break-out to see what all the fuss was about.

We recently decided to make our own sausages, out of the meat that we got back from our first lot of pigs. We bought all the materials and machine, and spent a warm summers evening sausage making. For future reference, don’t pick one of the hottest evenings of the year to make sausages, it’s hard work and we had to keep refrigerating the meat to ensure it didn’t get too warm.

When making the mince for the sausages you need 1/3 of fatty meat (such as pork belly) and 2/3 of lean meat (such as shoulder or leg). As our meat came straight from the butcher/abattoir, it wasn’t all neatly packaged and diced, ready for the mincer. We had to spend a considerable amount of time de-boning it and removing any excess fat or skin. The meat does not look anything like our pigs, but whilst trimming away unwanted bits, my other half came across one of the pig’s nipples, still attached to the bit of pork belly. Although sometimes it is good to distance yourself from what the meat once was (for emotional purposes) this was a stark reminder that our pigs gave their lives to feed us, so it was a sobering but welcome part of the process. Also, no-one wants a pig’s nipple in their banger (as it were), so we happily removed it, only quality bits of meat in our sausages!

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The whole process from meat preparation, to mincing, to actually filling the sausages took about 4 hours. 4 hours for 24 sausages is not a hugely economic way of making food, but it was our first time and next time we’ll be a whole lot quicker. We will probably prep at least twice the amount of meat in advance, so that the actual sausage making part is a lot slicker. It was good fun though (apart from all the stressful bits) and I would highly recommend it to anyone thinking of giving it a go. Gone are the days of sausages being filled with ‘lips and arsehole’ but good quality home-bred pork sausages are certainly something you can not beat.

Our first lot of Silver Bantam ducklings are almost a month old now and partially feathered. They are growing in confidence and under the watchful eye of their mum, doing really well.

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We also have a second lot of ducklings, now about two weeks old, and they are still yellow and fluffy. Their arrival was somewhat dramatic (once again they arrived slightly earlier than expected), meaning that we had to set up an intensive care unit in the house. Cagney, our Miniature Silver Appleyard, was sitting on a nest of nine eggs. Six successfully hatched and when my other half went in to remove some of the partially hatched/dead eggs, as he went to throw them in the bin, one of the eggs started peeping! Slower hatched eggs usually mean they are the ‘runt’ and in the wild, survival of the fittest would mean they would probably not make it. Feeling confident though, my other half returned the egg to the nest in hope that it would hatch under the safety of mum. After a few hours, he returned to find the chick hatched, but it had been rejected by mumma duck. Fearing that it would die not being brooded (kept warm) by its mum, he rushed it indoors and placed it in one of our existing chick brooder boxes, under a heat lamp. It looked very weak and we were not entirely sure it would make it.

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Fast forward 24hrs and it was fluffed up, peeping and stumbling/running all over the place. Success! We gave it another night in the incubator for extra strength and then my other half stealthily snuck it in under mum during the night, and she was none the wiser when she woke up the next morning with seven ducklings, instead of six. We aptly named this duckling ‘Seven of Nine’ (only Star Trek fans will get the reference) and although slightly smaller than the others, it is doing really well (always the one sticking close to mum) but you would never tell it had such a traumatic start in the world. Duck heroes do exist and I luckily have one living with me.
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Other than that, life on the farm is as busy as ever, we have had several visitors and it is always nice to share with others, the lifestyle we have quickly become accustomed to. I can’t imagine exchanging this back for city life and I thank my lucky stars everyday that we have been given the opportunity to get stuck in with rural countryside living.

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Which of course includes saving the occasional lamb from finding weird and wonderful ways in which to kill themselves. This one was lucky that on a hot summers day we were walking past, having just fed our pigs. Silly thing had gotten it’s head stuck in a fence and had been completely abandoned by the rest of the flock.

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A bit of elbow grease, as well as kneeling in a lot of sheep shit, and this little guy was free to trot on it’s merry way to join the rest of the woolly suicide clouds.

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Honestly, sheep are a nightmare to manage and are constantly getting themselves into mischief, often finding new ways to die on a daily basis. Which probably means it will no doubt be the next animal we end up getting….. #watchthisspace